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Alimony Archives

Tax implications associated with receiving alimony

While alimony can help you bridge the gap as you attempt to get back on your feet after a divorce, it's important to keep in mind that the receipt of these funds carries with it many tax obligations as well. Although property settlements or child support are both non-taxable, alimony is the complete opposite.

Do you need document backup when asking for spousal support?

While you don't always need as many documents as you might think to file for spousal support, it does help to come prepared. If you think you might file for spousal support of any type during or after a divorce, consider gathering some information ahead of time. When you meet with a lawyer, you'll already be somewhat prepared with documents and data, which can speed up the process. Here are some common documents you might need when filing for alimony or support.

Alimony orders can sometimes be modified

In our most recent blog post, we discussed how alimony doesn't have to be a forever arrangement. In some cases, we can work it to so that you have a time limit for the payments or we might be able to arrange a lump sum payment so that you don't have to worry about alimony again.

Alimony doesn't have to be a forever agreement

Many people look at alimony as a life-time agreement, but that's not always realistic. Understanding that alimony doesn't have to be a forever agreement is important when you're going through a divorce, especially if you're the one who is going to be making the payments. While the circumstances of your life now might mean alimony in a certain amount makes sense, the financial circumstances for both parties can change and it might be worth getting a temporary agreement in place or agreeing to revisit the amounts periodically.

How is alimony typically calculated?

The calculation of alimony actually varies a lot by case and by court. Alimony calculations aren't mandated by specific state rules in the same way child support is, and courts have some leeway in deciding matters related to alimony. In come cases, the two individuals might negotiate and agree to alimony outside of the court, and the court would likely honor such agreements.

There are many types of alimony

As you go through a divorce, you'll be faced with many questions. At some point, you may wonder if you're in position to receive alimony from your former spouse. While spousal support is not required by law in Florida, you may find that you are in position to fight for this type of payment.

Can alimony be modified?

In divorce, alimony can be ordered paid from one of the divorced parties to the other. These payments can be for life or only a set number of years. While every case is based on the unique circumstances of the divorced parties, in many cases the amount of alimony can be changed.

How long will I have to pay alimony?

Being required to pay alimony to an ex is an obligation many people across Florida would rather not have. If you have been ordered to pay spousal support, you are likely quite anxious to be done with making payments to someone to whom you are no longer married.

What's the history of alimony?

Historically speaking, alimony referred to a divorced husband's responsibility to provide support or sustenance to his ex-wife. Alimony used to be a responsibility reserved just for husbands, and a common law right of wives. These days, it doesn't matter what sex you happen to be; you might still need to pay alimony after a divorce or separation.

Florida might soon put an end to permanent alimony

Divorces in Florida often involve questions concerning alimony, and this can be a heated topic of debate, especially of a spouse is in danger of having to pay permanent alimony. Permanent alimony occurs when an ex-husband or ex-wife is required to pay a certain amount of money for the rest of his or her ex-spouse's life. Many people feel that permanent alimony is unfair and a lot of Florida lawmakers agree. In fact, a new bill will soon be voted on in Tallahassee, which could end permanent alimony once and for all.